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Please note, this CV is no longer being updated. It has been preserved in its current state (25 September 2014) as a record of a past project.

Adam Crymble
 
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CONFERENCE, WORKSHOP & INVITED PRESENTATIONS

  1. Adam Crymble. "Profiling Irish Crime in London 1801-1820" British History in the Long Eighteenth Century Seminar, Institute for Historical Research, London, UK. 24 October 2012.
  2. Adam Crymble. "Identifying the Irish in Electronic Text: Surname Analysis and Irish Defendants in the Old Bailey Online" London Irish in the Long Eighteenth Century. Coventry, UK. 13 April 2012.
  3. Adam Crymble. "Quantifying and Extrapolating: Identifying London's Historical Irish Population in the Absence of Direct Evidence" Interface, University College London. London, UK. July 2012.
  4. Adam Crymble. "The Media and London's Irish Population: 1801-1820" British History in the Long Eighteenth Century Seminar (PechaKucha style), Institute for Historical Research, London, UK. November 2010.

TEACHING HISTORY

Adam is currently a Graduate Teaching Assistant on the first year module "Early Modern British History" in the department of History at King's College London.

This role involves running weekly seminars for students to encourage discussion on the readings, as well as grading essays and providing feedback. He has held this position for two consecutive years under the supervision of Dr. Lucy Kostyanovsky.

CURRENT PHD THESIS RESEARCH

Understanding the London Irish Immigrant Experience through Large-Scale Textual Analysis: 1801-1820

Historical research of the nineteenth century paints a negative picture of the London attitude towards Irish immigrants. Strife sells. But is this interpretation representative of opinion? And how can we check?

Since much of the historical research has been written, the world has changed drastically. Massive, reliable, scholarly datasets have appeared online in formats that allow large-scale interrogation.

My research asks what those scholarly datasets can tell us about the relationship between the Irish and the locals that we couldn't previously ask. To do this I am employing a range of techniques, including distant reading, close reading, and textual analysis to see the strengths and limits of each in the pursuit of understanding about the past.example of an anti-Irish caricature

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH

Adam is currently working on a collaborative project with Professor Tim Hitchcock and Louise Falcini looking at London's response to vagrancy.

He's happy to report that work is progressing well, and you'll be the first to know when we have some findings to share.

This research is funded by the British Academy & Leverhulme Small Research Grant programme (2012).

POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH

Adam is happy to entertain suggestions for postdoctoral research projects. Particularly projects that involve working with historical datasets and seek to push the envelope of what historians can discover about the past through new research methods and computational techniques.

Collaboration is something too often overlooked by historians, but something Adam finds quite rewarding. If you are thinking of putting together a proposal for a project beginning in the fall of 2014 and believe Adam's skills could enrich the project, do get in touch. He'd love to hear form you